The Irish language has the best weird translations of common animal names

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There is certainly a popular stating in the Gaeilgeoir, or Irish Speaker, group: “Is fearr linn Gaeilge briste, ná Béarla cliste,” which in essence suggests “Damaged Irish is much better than clever English.”

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I’m American, but I heard this refrain quite a few instances when I experienced the privilege of curating an Irish language Twitter account a single week. I was anxious, as I have been finding out the language as a informal interest more than the final few decades. But the indigenous speakers ended up remarkably encouraging—they have been just delighted to use the language at all, and to share its musicality with some others. (I consider the language is getting a bit of a renaissance suitable now, as individuals in their 20s-40s really feel a longing for a cultural connection that their Boomer mothers and fathers neglected in their eagerness to assimilate).

This is all to say that: I can assure you that these Irish translations of common animal names are completely serious. And even though they’re not damagedIrish, they are nonetheless far far more intelligent than everything our bastard mutt English tongue could ever arrive up with:

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This is just not like in English, where we giggle about “titmice” and “cocks” for the reason that of the unintended double entendre. “Cíoch” isin factbreast. “Bod” is in actuality a penis. These are pretty literal translations no hidden suggestive meanings about it.

And, if you question me, they are additional exact than our English names for them.

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If you’re interested in a lot more odd and irreverent Irish translations, my friend Darach Ó Séaghdha runs a Twitter account named The Irish For, exactly where he shares things like this:

He also has a e-book out known as “Motherfoclóir” (“foclóir” currently being the Irish phrase for dictionary or, nicely, “terms”) and yet another one particular known as “Craic Little one” (“craic” getting an Irish word with no direct translation, but that mainly usually means entertaining or superior situations).

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