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Op-ed: Can compromise help US recover from a year full of division and infighting?

Compromise. A simple little word can mean so much. In US, it’s seen as the moderate side, not trying to fit between party lines. Events like these shined politics just before 2021.

On 8th December, the United States House Of Representatives passed the 2021 National Defense Authorization Act. The House agreed a compromise $740.5 billion defense policy bill by a veto-proof majority. Now, it goes to the Senate, where it is likely to be passed on a bipartisan basis. With over 60% of the vote for the bill, President Trump will not be allowed to Veto it. Instead, it will be signed into law and cater as next year‘s defense bill. This would include a 34 million dollar increase for infrastructure improvements.

All of these are just a few of the steps that are helping Democrats, Republicans, Bernie Sanders and Angus King recover from what was a year full of division, infighting, and scrutiny from the American People.

Compromise amongst a deeply divided nation

But could this be a first step to reaching compromise amongst a deeply divided nation? On 8th, Republican Lawmakers on Capitol Hill still made their way around a question, that is now, known to be a weekly tradition in some GOP efforts to undermine the results of the 2020 results that helped Joe Biden and Senator Harris reach the White House. But as I said, these were only “efforts”, and those too in the public. Behind closed doors, the GOP Senator from Missouri Roy Blunt, who also happens to be the chair of the Joint Congressional Committee on Inaugural Ceremonies, is preparing for what is to be an 8% virtual Inauguration day on January 20th, 2021.

The committee is formed with bi-partisan support each election year. This Year, it consists of House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, Leader Steny Hoyer, Senator Blunt, Leader McCarthy, Senator Klobuchar, and Senator McConnell. So three Republicans, three Democrats, and as planned the committee is moving forward with the inaugural plans and the inaugural website (inaugural.senate.gov).

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One wrong senator

Also moving forward is the upper chamber that was recently brought to the table, a requirement of a National Museum of the American Latino and an American Women’s History Museum as part of the Smithsonian Institution. This bill, with an independent recommendation, passed the House and was unanimously up for passage in the Senate was blocked by radically conservative and longtime Trump ally, Sen. Mike Lee (R-UT).

Usually, when GOP senators move to block passage, other Republicans barely speak up, but on this occasion, Sen. Susan Collins of Maine had harsh words for the Utah Senators’ rational but illegitimate reasons. She added, “I could not help but wonder as I heard the comments of my colleague from Utah whether he also tried to block the museum celebrating and telling the history of African Americans.” “It seems wrong that one senator can block consideration of a bill that would have overwhelming support by a majority of this body.”

Compromise. A simple little word can mean so much. In America, it’s seen as the moderate side, not trying to fit between party lines.

Healing from a partisan divide

But Republicans are not the only ones looking towards sustainable chambers. In a talk with reporters Wednesday, the Senator from Massachusetts confirmed that she would vote against the waiver for Gen. Austin. President-elect Joe Biden for Defense Secretary nominated Gen. Austin.  Federal law prohibits former military officials from serving as defense secretary, within seven years of finishing active duty.  To overcome this, Congress must vote for a waiver for any potential nominee. As Washington is still healing from its partisan divide, the GOP is expected to Vote NO on the Waiver and the confirmation.  However, many Democrats on the Hill are also expected to Vote NO on the waiver as it goes against their own decision to Vote NO on Trump‘s Defense Secretary Mattis‘ decision.

All of these are just a few of the steps that are helping Democrats, Republicans, Bernie Sanders and Angus King recover from what was a year full of division, infighting, and scrutiny from the American People.

Read more: Power shift in US: All eyes on Biden

Juan Abbas is a freelance writer for the Daily Times. The views expressed in this article are the author’s own and do not necessarily reflect the editorial policy of Global Village Space.

 

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