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Prime Minister Justin Trudeau in a March 7, 2019 file photo. (LARS HAGBERG, AFP/Getty Images) If you think you’re coming off a bad week, consider poor Justin Trudeau over the past seven days. The PM has been called out by powerhouse lawyer Marie Henein over his fake feminism, the Norman trial blew up in his face and in the media and the auditor general issued a report showing his government failed to properly handle the border crisis. I’m only scratching the surface because I’ll be open and frank, I was away all last week trying not to pay attention to news here in Canada. A cab drops off a couple of asylum seekers at the US/Canada border near Champlain, New York, August 20, 2017. Thousands of refugees have been streaming across the Canada/US over the past few months, overwhelming the government’s capacity to house them while their claims are processed. / AFP PHOTO / Geoff RobinsGEOFF ROBINS/AFP/Getty Images ORG XMIT: POS2017082314200546 Yet, despite my best efforts to devote my full attention on beautiful cities and medieval castles in places like Waterford and Kilkenny over in Ireland, the news punched through. I was able to ignore — at first — the auditor general’s report on the processing of asylum claims where interim auditor Sylvain Ricard pointed out the massive delays in the system due to poor government management. “People seeking asylum in Canada wait about two years for decisions from a rigid system that can’t adjust to volume spikes,” the report stated. And we all know there have been spikes over the past three years, including more than 40,000 people that have flooded the system by using an illegal border crossing from the United States. Throughout that time, the PM has assured the whole country there was no impact on the system, that the system was working as it should. So why then are people waiting 2 years for a decision instead of the requirement that most cases be heard within 60 days? That delay isn’t fair to anyone — the asylum claimant that lives in limbo or the taxpayers of Canada that have pumped billions extra into a system that isn’t working properly. Did I tell you that the report revealed that departments involved in this mess are still relying on paper documents and faxing each other? “Even when claim information was available electronically, it was printed out and shared between organizations by fax or courier,” the report said. Anyone want to check their calendar? It is 2019. Then there is the Norman trial. Try as I did to pay attention to the Norman castles in Ireland, the Norman trial back home was blowing up my phone. Texts, e-mails, direct messages. People were contacting me about the explosive news that the government dropped the charges against Vice-Admiral Mark Norman on breach of trust. Norman’s lawyer, Marie Henein, said the decision to drop the charges was not political and was made by the independent prosecutor. I’ll take her at her word but we can’t come to any other conclusion than this was a politically-motivated trial from the start. Henein herself had claimed that in court, documents released to the court showed the Privy Council Office coordinating trial strategy with prosecutors. And, of course, this all started when former clerk of the Privy Council Michael Wernick wrote a 60-page memo to the PM on Norman which eventually led to the PCO calling the RCMP and asking them to investigate. You may remember Wernick from such scandals as SNC-Lavalin where he asked former attorney general Jody Wilson-Raybould to take over the prosecution of SNC so they could get their sweetheart deal and avoid conviction. Yes, that same guy, that same Trudeau team. There is no doubt this started in politics. Perhaps as Henein says, the prosecutors didn’t let politics enter their decision to drop the case and let Norman go free, maybe it was just new information presented by the defence. In that case, Henein was absolutely right when she uttered this cutting line to the media on Wednesday. “Fortunately vice-admiral Norman didn’t fire the females he hired.”

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau in a March 7, 2019 file photo. (LARS HAGBERG, AFP/Getty Images)

If you think you’re coming off a bad week, consider poor Justin Trudeau over the past seven days.

The PM has been called out by powerhouse lawyer Marie Henein over his fake feminism, the Norman trial blew up in his face and in the media and the auditor general issued a report showing his government failed to properly handle the border crisis.

I’m only scratching the surface because I’ll be open and frank, I was away all last week trying not to pay attention to news here in Canada.

A cab drops off a couple of asylum seekers at the US/Canada border near Champlain, New York, August 20, 2017. Thousands of refugees have been streaming across the Canada/US over the past few months, overwhelming the government’s capacity to house them while their claims are processed. / AFP PHOTO / Geoff RobinsGEOFF ROBINS/AFP/Getty Images ORG XMIT: POS2017082314200546

Yet, despite my best efforts to devote my full attention on beautiful cities and medieval castles in places like Waterford and Kilkenny over in Ireland, the news punched through.

I was able to ignore — at first — the auditor general’s report on the processing of asylum claims where interim auditor Sylvain Ricard pointed out the massive delays in the system due to poor government management.

“People seeking asylum in Canada wait about two years for decisions from a rigid system that can’t adjust to volume spikes,” the report stated.

And we all know there have been spikes over the past three years, including more than 40,000 people that have flooded the system by using an illegal border crossing from the United States.

Throughout that time, the PM has assured the whole country there was no impact on the system, that the system was working as it should. So why then are people waiting 2 years for a decision instead of the requirement that most cases be heard within 60 days?

That delay isn’t fair to anyone — the asylum claimant that lives in limbo or the taxpayers of Canada that have pumped billions extra into a system that isn’t working properly.

Did I tell you that the report revealed that departments involved in this mess are still relying on paper documents and faxing each other?

“Even when claim information was available electronically, it was printed out and shared between organizations by fax or courier,” the report said.

Anyone want to check their calendar? It is 2019.

Then there is the Norman trial.

Try as I did to pay attention to the Norman castles in Ireland, the Norman trial back home was blowing up my phone.

Texts, e-mails, direct messages.

People were contacting me about the explosive news that the government dropped the charges against Vice-Admiral Mark Norman on breach of trust.

Norman’s lawyer, Marie Henein, said the decision to drop the charges was not political and was made by the independent prosecutor. I’ll take her at her word but we can’t come to any other conclusion than this was a politically-motivated trial from the start.

Henein herself had claimed that in court, documents released to the court showed the Privy Council Office coordinating trial strategy with prosecutors.

And, of course, this all started when former clerk of the Privy Council Michael Wernick wrote a 60-page memo to the PM on Norman which eventually led to the PCO calling the RCMP and asking them to investigate.

You may remember Wernick from such scandals as SNC-Lavalin where he asked former attorney general Jody Wilson-Raybould to take over the prosecution of SNC so they could get their sweetheart deal and avoid conviction.

Yes, that same guy, that same Trudeau team.

There is no doubt this started in politics.

Perhaps as Henein says, the prosecutors didn’t let politics enter their decision to drop the case and let Norman go free, maybe it was just new information presented by the defence.

In that case, Henein was absolutely right when she uttered this cutting line to the media on Wednesday.

“Fortunately vice-admiral Norman didn’t fire the females he hired.”


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